Wow! Super Smart Dog!!

it’s been a little while since we posted a great video.  We at Nola Pet Source know that  you  need some awesome pet videos to get you through the day. And so, for your health and mine, I have undertaken the arduous task of, once again, searching YouTube for the best pet videos.  I know, I know- I’m something of a hero.  But I don’t do it for the fame, the glory, or the praise.  I do it for the people.  And the pets.   Without further ado,  here it is.  Your amazing pet video.  This dog is amazing.

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Mardi Paws on the Northshore!

2003 Captain

Don’t forget to check out Mardi Paws 2010 along Lakeshore Dr. in Mandeville.  It’s sure to be tons of fun!  All dogs are required to be in costume or at least heavily adorned with beads, feathers, etc.  It’s always fun to watch dogs who have been dressed up in costume.  Really, I don’t think anything can beat it.  It is, perhaps, the reason we live.  The reason we get up in the morning.  The reason we carry on in this cruel, cruel world.  Dogs in costume- they save us from ourselves.

The parade is on Sunday, February 21, 2010 at 12:30 pm.  Same day registration – $15 for one dog, $45 for 3 or more dogs from the same household.  Or just come and watch the festivities!  Please visit Mardi Paws.com for all the details and contact info for the parade!

Don’t miss it, or you’ll be kicking yourself later!!

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XX

The art of tick removal

Here’s an unpleasant task that almost every pet owner will have to do at some point: removing a tick from their beloved cat or dog (or any animal that goes outdoors and plays in trees, grass, and underbrush). I remember the first time my dog, Zoe, got a tick. My husband and I cornered her on her bed and came at her with a match and some tweezers. We had no idea what we were doing. Luckily, there is the internet, and I have now fully studied and mastered the art of tick removal. By the way, apparently, the match trick can actually cause quite a bit of harm, as it often causes the tick to regurgitate all that nasty stuff inside it, which is not a great thing since ticks can carry Lyme Disease, Rocky Mountain Fever, and many other illnesses.

From my studies in the art of tick removal at the prestigious Internet University, I have learned that it is best to remove the tick without trying to cause it any major discomfort. When a tick gets mad (ie: burned with the hot end of a match, smothered in petroleum jelly, etc.), it tends to release extra saliva and possibly even to vomit. Not too appealing to either me or my dogs.

So, there is no easy way to make that little sucker (no pun intended) let go of his own accord. He is on and he is not going anywhere without a fight. The most important thing is to remove the FULL tick. You do not want to leave his head or mandibles lodged in your pets flesh. And how does one go about this? There are several tools available to aid you in this crusade. We will discuss a few of them.

Tweezers. Good, old-fashioned tweezers. Everybody’s got them and they are occasionally easy to find. So grab a pair of tweezers, grasp the tick by his head, and pull up in one smooth and straight motion. Do not grasp him by the body, or you risk leaving the head/mandibles behind. Also, do not twist as you are pulling. Sounds simple enough, but to complicate matters, allow me to point out that tweezers can sometimes squeeze our little tick buddy, causing him to, you guessed it- vomit. Dang. I thought we were trying to avoid that.

Enter the Tick Twister and Ticked Off. These are two products made specifically for removing ticks.

Tick TwisterThe Original TICKED OFF

Both of these products are placed under the tick such that it can be removed without squeezing it. They also remove the tick without leaving the head or mandibles lodged inside your pet’s skin.

Watch this video about using the Tick Twister:

The tick twister comes in two sizes- one for small ticks and one for large ticks. Ticks, however, can be QUITE small, and many users have commented that it was difficult to get very small ticks caught between the tines. Thus, Ticked off can be a good option for smaller ticks.

Ticks can be very dangerous, so be sure to check your pets frequently. Be sure to check between your pet’s toes and in and on their ears. If you do find a tick, it is important to remove it immediately, using one of the safe methods described above. You may want to consider a tick prevention product, as well. Also, if your pet has lots of ticks, you might want to try a tick bath, as opposed to removing them all individually. Additionally, it is not a bad idea to keep the tick in a plastic bag so that if your dog begins showing any signs of illness, you can have the tick tested for Lyme disease or other diseases.

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DIY: Home-Made Sweet Potato Chews

These sweet potato chews are awesome! They’re EASY, healthy, you know exactly what’s in them, and your dogs will love them!

1) Clean a sweet potato
2) Cut it into 1/4″ slices
3) Lay the slices on a baking sheet
4) Dry them in the oven at 250 degrees for 3-3.5 hours.

Voila!

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DIY: Home-made pumpkin dog treats

These treats will keep you, your budget, and your dogs as happy as can be!

Yummy Pumpkin Cookies:

Ingredients:

1 cup of canned pure pumpkin,

3-4 tablespoons of peanut butter,

1 egg,

enough whole wheat flour until it is non-sticky

Directions:

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees. Combine all ingredients.  Roll out into a sheet and cut into your favorite shape, or just roll into individual balls.  Place cookies on a baking sheet and bake for 40 minutes.

Easy as pie!  Healthy, delicious, and cheaper than store bought!  What more could you ask for?

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DIY: Pom Pom Dog Toy

Pom-Pom Ball Toy 6

My friend, Michelle, is essentially the Martha Stewart of Pets.  When I went to visit her for Christmas, I saw all of these adorable pet toys and she casually stated, “I made those.”  I was impressed.  Some of them even had squeekies in them!  She sent me the link to one of the toys she made, called the fleece pom pom ball.  See the instructions here.

One day, I will make one of these for my dogs and when I do, I will post my results on the blog. If any of you make a pom pom ball, please share your experience and pictures!  We would love to see them!

Michelle’s tips:

Once I wrap it around the cardboard, I tie it in several bundles though, not one like it says on the website, and then combine the bundles.  Otherwise, the fleece pieces fall out too easily.

Have a happy play day with your pooch!!

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Mystic Krewe of Barkus 2010

It’s almost that time, again!  Mardi Gras 2010!  I can see it now: Beads!  Beer!  Barking?  Yep!  The Mystic Krewe of Barkus proves that even dogs have a place in our beloved New Orleans traditions.  The parade occurs on Sunday, February 7, 2010.  It begins at Armostrong Park at 2pm and will follow the traditional route.  There is also a “Pawty” before, during, and after (gotta love new orleans!) at Armstrong Park starting at 10:30 am.

If you plan on attending the Pawty, it is free of charge to one and all.  If you plan on dressing your pooch up in a fantastic Mardi Gras costume and allowing him to romp around the streets of New Orleans with all of his party-loving pooch friends, you’ll have to register either online or on-site.  If you choose to register the day of the parade, you will sign up at Armstrong Park and pay a $50 registration fee.  Signing up online saves you a bit of dough.  Additionally, if you want to register without attending the parade, you can do so online for $20 which will benefit homeless animal rescue and adoption.

Don’t forget about the Barkus Royal Ball!  Friday, February 13.  Unfortunately, this black-tie event is for humans only.  Find out more information here.

Check out these great pics from last years parade:

2009-Mystic-Krewe-of-Barkus-Mardi-Gras-French-Quarter-New-Orleans-Dog-Parade-04772009-Mystic-Krewe-of-Barkus-Mardi-Gras-French-Quarter-New-Orleans-Dog-Parade-04972009-Mystic-Krewe-of-Barkus-Mardi-Gras-French-Quarter-New-Orleans-Dog-Parade-0499

For more information, visit http://www.barkus.org or http://www.mardigrasparadeschedule.com/krewes/barkus/

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